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Second Life Batteries project

Bosch cooperates with BMW and Vattenfall

Batteries from electric vehicles for a stable power grid, second Life Batteries project



Isabel Lebon
Agence Peter & Associés
Phone: + 33 1 42 59 73 95


Harald Frank-Lerendu
Communication Director
Robert Bosch (France) SAS
32, avenue Michelet
93400 Saint-Ouen
+33 (0)1 40 10 71 11


2015-01-21 | France

Bosch cooperates with BMW and Vattenfall

Batteries from electric vehicles for a stable power grid

Second Life Batteries project

- Connecting electromobility and energy storage systems

- More than 100 vehicle batteries to stabilize power grid

- Storage systems a core element of the move to alternative forms of energy

What to do with valuable batteries once they have reached the end of their life cycle in electric vehicles? A project involving three partners is connecting old batteries in Hamburg to form a large-scale storage system to keep the power grid stable.

Stuttgart – Electromobility and power storage are two core elements of the move to alternative forms of energy. A project is bringing Bosch, the BMW Group, and Vattenfall together to drive progress on both technologies by interconnecting used batteries from electric vehicles to form a large-scale energy storage system in Hamburg. Its energy is available within seconds and can help keep the power grid stable.

Bosch, BMW, and Vattenfall believe in this concept and as a result have launched the Second Life Batteries alliance. BMW is supplying batteries from its ActiveE and i3 electric vehicles, while Vattenfall has agreed to operate the massive storage system at its site for a period of ten years. Bosch is in charge of integrating the batteries and managing the system. The storage solution will become part of an already existing Vattenfall virtual power plant. This allows the partners to combine various small, decentralized power generating systems to market them as a shared power plant.

Still valuable

Lithium-ion batteries still have high storage capacity at the end of their life cycle in electric vehicles. As a result, they are still very valuable and can be used extremely efficiently as stationary buffer storage for many years to come. The project allows the three partners to gain numerous new insights into potential areas of application for such batteries, their aging behavior, and their storage capacity. Bosch’s management algorithm is intended to ensure maximum service life and performance as well as other benefits.

The company has already gained its first experiences in the field. In Braderup, located near the German island of Sylt, Bosch has built one of Europe’s largest energy storage systems to temporarily store the energy generated by a wind farm if needed. To do so, the company has connected thousands of small lithium-ion batteries to form a large-scale network. In Kelsterbach, a community close to Frankfurt, Bosch has installed a similar lithium-ion storage system at a housing complex. This knowledge is also making a difference in the Second Life Batteries project.

“The project is important because it combines two strategically significant goals,” says Bosch CEO Dr. Volkmar Denner, who believes in the future of the electric drive. “In electromobility, we see a future mass market accompanied by many new business models and solutions,” the physicist adds. “Stationary energy storage systems that enable people to continue making good use of used batteries are part of this. Such decentralized storage systems allow us to make a major contribution to a secure power supply.”

Core element of the move to alternative forms of energy

Energy storage systems are considered to be a core element of the move to alternative forms of energy. They can absorb solar power during the daytime and release it at night – or secure wind power for moments when the wind is calm. By doing so, they help better integrate the often fluctuating supply of renewable energy into the power grid. Electromobility can also benefit from this development by making it possible to charge vehicles with solar power at night along with a host of other options. In addition, a storage system can supply its energy rapidly to stabilize power grids as part of a virtual power plant, for example.

Two megawatts of capacity

The current plans call for the construction of a storage unit with an output of two megawatts (MW) and an installed capacity of two megawatt hours (MWh) in Hamburg. The energy will be fed into the energy balancing market to balance out short-term fluctuations in the power grid. More than 100 vehicle batteries will be interconnected to achieve these targets. The entire system is compact enough to fit in a small building. It provides enough output in mathematical terms to supply 30 four-person households with power for seven days. The partners expect the storage unit to be operational by the end of 2015.


BMW homepage:

Vatenfall newsroom:

Bosch stationary energy storage solutions:

Energy storage system in Braderup:

Energy storage system in Kelsterbach:

The Bosch Group is present in France since 1899 with the opening of its first representative office. It is also in Paris, in 1905, Bosch installs the first plant outside of Germany. With 24 plants and 10 for Research & Development, all activities of the Group are represented in France. The Group achieved in 2015, with a staff of 7,800 people, a turnover of € 2.996 billion in the country.

The Bosch Group is a leading global supplier of technology and services. It employs roughly 375,000 associates worldwide (as of December 31, 2015). The company generated sales of 70.6 billion euros in 2015. Its operations are divided into four business sectors: Mobility Solutions, Industrial Technology, Consumer Goods, and Energy and Building Technology. The Bosch Group comprises Robert Bosch GmbH and its roughly 440 subsidiaries and regional companies in some 60 countries. Including sales and service partners, Bosch’s global manufacturing and sales network covers some 150 countries. The basis for the company’s future growth is its innovative strength. Bosch employs 55,800 associates in research and development at roughly 118 locations across the globe. The Bosch Group’s strategic objective is to deliver innovations for a connected life. Bosch improves quality of life worldwide with products and services that are innovative and spark enthusiasm. In short, Bosch creates technology that is “Invented for life.”

The company was set up in Stuttgart in 1886 by Robert Bosch (1861-1942) as “Workshop for Precision Mechanics and Electrical Engineering.” The special ownership structure of Robert Bosch GmbH guarantees the entrepreneurial freedom of the Bosch Group, making it possible for the company to plan over the long term and to undertake significant up-front investments in the safeguarding of its future. Ninety-two percent of the share capital of Robert Bosch GmbH is held by Robert Bosch Stiftung GmbH, a charitable foundation. The majority of voting rights are held by Robert Bosch Industrietreuhand KG, an industrial trust. The entrepreneurial ownership functions are carried out by the trust. The remaining shares are held by the Bosch family and by Robert Bosch GmbH.

Further information is available online at: